Tag Archives: Meeting of the Minds

The Meeting of the (Founding Fathers’) Minds: A Performance Assessment and Rubric

In my AP U.S. History course, students are now learning about the American Revolution, and the early days of the republic. I think a good assessment for a unit such as this would be a performance assessment, a Meeting of the Minds, if you will, in which the students act as Founding Fathers and discuss the primary issues and compromises they must face as they begin about creating a new republic.

The Meeting of the Minds prompt will look as follows:

Mr. _________ ___________ (I will assign each student a different Founding Father and write their name here),

You have been formally invited to to participate in our great nation’s Constitutional Convention here in Philadelphia in this year of our Lord, 1787. We have many things to discuss regarding the drafting of a viable and long-lasting Constitution. I ask you be prepared to discuss your opinions on several matters including the Articles of Confederation, state versus federal rights, the duties of our federal government, the balance of federal power, legislative representation, and the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

 I look forward to your participation in this momentous meeting.

APUSH students: The person to whom this letter is addressed is your assigned character. You will research his life and political philosophy, and know very well where he stands on each of the issues mentioned above.

You will also be required to research the Constitutional Convention itself and determine what role your character had in the meeting (did he lead it? Did he mobilize others? Did he express his state’s concerns or address federal concerns? Who was he in agreement with?), and use this knowledge to conduct yourself in a historically accurate manner in our 2015 Meeting of the (Founding Fathers’) Minds.

There will be up to 10 points of extra credit for historically accurate costumes. I will be happy to connect you with the theater’s costume department if this is of interest.

The rubric is as follows:

In Character 10

Student knows about their character’s life and theories and responds to the issues addressed at the Convention accurately.

Student never falls out of character.

8

Student knows some about their character’s life and theories and responds to the issues addressed at the Convention mostly accurately.

Student falls out of character only a few times.

6

Student knows some about their character’s life and theories and how they would respond to the issues addressed at the Convention.

Student falls out of character every so often.

4

Student is not dressed as their character.

Student knows only a little about their character’s life and theories and how they would respond to the issues addressed at the Convention.

Student falls in and out of character throughout.

2

Student is not dressed as their character.

Student knows little to nothing about their character’s life and theories and how they would respond to the issues addressed at the Convention.

Student is never in character.

 

Participation

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

Student is constantly engaged in the debate and conversation.

Student offers several new and thoughtful ideas and questions to the floor.

8

Student mostly engaged in the debate and conversation.

Student offers some new and thoughtful ideas and questions to the floor.

6

Student is somewhat engaged in debate and conversation.

Student offers a few new and thoughtful ideas and questions to the floor.

4

Student is hardly engaged in debate and conversation.

Student offers very few new and thoughtful and ideas to the floor.

 

 

2

Student is not at all engaged in debate and conversation.

Students offers no new or thoughtful and ideas to the floor.

Historically Accurate 10

Student acts in character’s role at the Convention accurately.

Ideas and language used are historically accurate and well-researched.

8

Student acts in character’s role at the Convention mostly accurately.

Ideas and language used are mostly historically accurate and well-researched.

6

Student acts in character’s role at the Convention somewhat accurately.

Ideas and language used are somewhat historically accurate and well-researched.

4

Student acts in character’s role at the Convention with little accuracy.

Ideas and language used are not very historically accurate or well-researched.

2

Student acts in character’s role at the Convention inaccurately.

Ideas and language used are not at all historically accurate or well-researched.

Good Citizen 10

Student is always respectful of his or her peers.

Student inspires and allows others in the class to respond and engage respectfully as well.

8

Student is mostly respectful of his or her peers.

Student mostly inspires and allows others in the class to respond and engage respectfully as well.

6

Student is mostly respectful of his or her peers.

Student sometimes pushes and allows others in the class to respond and engage respectfully as well.

4

Student is somewhat respectful of his or her peers.

Student hardly pushes and allows others in the class to respond and engage respectfully as well.

2

Student is not respectful of his or her peers.

Student does not push or allow others in the class to respond and engage respectfully as well.

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